7 Interesting Dialects Starting a-i-u-e-o Used in Rural Japan

02/11/2018MAZE-GERO CITY

I’m off today and study dialect spoken in Maze to share them with you guys.

Ageru=Vomit

Originally, “Ageru” means “Give” in Japanese.

It’ll suprise most of Japanese people since they think it has completely different meaning.

Actually, this word is used not only in Maze but nationwide, especially in area around Osaka and Kyoto.

It depends on generation so elderly people sometimes use it.

You should be careful the word “Ageru” since it doesn’t always mean “Give a present”, haha.

Abaena=Goodbye

This is usually spoken in Hida area, which includes Maze and the mid of Japan, famous for Shirakawa village.

We have a similar word in terms of pronunciation, which is “Abayo” and used also in urban area.

“Omae-san, abaena.”

Omae-san means “You” same as “Anata”.

We shouldn’t use it in a business since it’s an informal word.

A-han=Yeah, No

The prononciation is almost same as “Uh-huh” in English.

Here are the examples for daily use.

A:”Today, it rained a lot.”

B:”A-han (=yeah), it was hard for me to run around here.”

A:”Oh, it’s not tasty so much. Is this a cheap one, right?”

B:”A-han (=no), this is the most expensive one.”

Ikiru=Humid

Ikiru originally means “Alive” in Japan.

Sometimes, Japanese people use it when they tell somebody not to be arrogant.

In Hida-area, they say it when it’s so humid.

We don’t have tropical nights in Maze, but I’d like to hear the word spoken.

Useru=Come

It appears to be an anicient word from Japanese dictionary like “Ageru”.

We usually say it when we ask someone to get away so now it has an opposite meaning.

Actually, this word is spoken in a bad occasion and people use it like below example.

“When he useru (=come) here, we always get unluckiness.”

Oku=Stop

“Shall we oku (=stop) our work and leave the office? now”

This is also a dialect used in Kinki or Kyushu areas.

You should also remember that original meaning of “Oku” is “Place”.

Onmo=Outside

This is the last word in a series of a-i-u-e-o.

“Play onmo (=outside)

“Onmo” is a baby language whose meaning is outside.

We can hear this word in a scene of one of the most famous movies in Japan.

Spirited Away – Bo

Bo says the word in Spirited Away that is still a movie with the highest box office revenue.

“There are a lot of germs onmo (=outside)”

Summary

Today, I’ve shared a-i-u-e-o dialects spoken in Maze.

  • Ageru=Vomit
  • Abaena=Goodbye
  • A-han=Yeah, No
  • Ikiru=Humid
  • Useru=Come
  • Oku=Stop
  • Onmo=Outside

Please try to use it when you come to Maze.